mobile computing

How law firms are adapting to remote work

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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How law firms are adapting to remote work

Lawyers across the country have been sheltering in place for weeks now, and for many, there is no immediate end in sight. The move to remote work was a sudden one, with governors instituting social distancing requirements seemingly overnight. Notably, many firms were unprepared for this change, and as a result business continuity proved to be a pressing issue.

However, over time, firms adapted. They had to; they had no choice.

Now that a few weeks have passed, working from home has become the new normal, but it hasn’t always gone smoothly. The transition was easier for some firms than others, as borne out by the results of a recent survey. The nationwide survey was conducted by MyCase (the company for which I work) from April 8th-10th, with 819 legal professionals responding. Some findings regarding remote work were expected, but others were more surprising.

For starters, the transition to working from home full-time occurred fairly quickly for many firms, with 46% reporting that it took a day or less to establish a virtual law practice. 31% shared that it took 2-3 days, 13% did so after a week, and for 10% of respondents it took 2 weeks or more.

Not surprisingly, the majority of lawyers reported that at the time of the survey their firms were operating remotely in one form or another. After all, necessity breeds ingenuity. Specifically, 48% of lawyers indicated that all law firm employees were working remotely. Another 39% shared that some of their employees were working remotely. Only 12% reported that their firms were open for business with all employees working in the physical office. Finally, only 1% had closed their firms’ doors for the time being.

Most law firms didn’t have all of the necessary technology tools in place to enable their firms to move to a remote practice overnight. This was an unprecedented situation, so the lack of preparedness was to be expected. That being said, the majority of legal professional have adapted to the sudden change in circumstance very adeptly, and at an incredibly rapid pace. So much so that that I’d go so far as to say that much of the technology adoption that occurred over the past month would not have otherwise occurred for another 5 years or more.

Because working remotely necessarily requires better communication methods, it’s no surprise that due to the shelter in place mandates certain forms of online communication exploded in popularity overnight. The survey results provided insight into the specific tools adopted by law firms over the past month.

Video conferencing was the top technology adopted by firms due to remote work requirements, with 529 indicating that their firms had begun to use it. Next, 235 respondents shared that their firms had invested in new hardware, such as laptops. 206 reported that their firms had not adopted any new technology, followed by VOIP phone systems (55), online fax (55), data backup (49), payment tools (47), internet security (46), and other (34).

Finally, the responding lawyers weighed in on whether they felt prepared to work from home with the technology tools supplied by their firm. The survey results showed that 79% of law firm staff using cloud-based systems felt that they had what they needed to work from home, whereas only 59% of non-cloud based users sharing that sentiment. 

Has your firm moved to remote work? How does your firm’s transition process compare? Hopefully you feel well prepared to provide legal services while working from home. If not, rest assured, there is technology available that can fill the gap and streamline your work processes so that you’re able to work as efficiently and effectively from home as you do in the office. But if you don’t take advantage of it, you only have yourself to blame. So what are you waiting for? Research your options, choose the right tools, and get to work!

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com. 

 


Cloud and mobile computing trends for lawyers in 2020

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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Cloud and mobile computing trends for lawyers in 2020

I started writing about cloud and mobile computing and their potential benefits for the legal profession in 2008. Two years later I began to work on a draft of my book “Cloud Computing for Lawyers,” which was published by the American Bar Association in 2012. Back then, convincing lawyers that cloud computing was the future and that its benefits far outweighed the risks was a tough sell. This is because at the time many lawyers were understandably skeptical, and expressed concerns about the ethical and security issues presented by the use of cloud computing by lawyers.

Fast forward to 2019 and how times have changed! The majority of lawyers are now using cloud and mobile computing tools as part of their day-to-day practices and are reaping the benefits offered by mobile law practices. For proof you need look no further than the latest ABA Legal Technology Survey Report, which was released earlier this month.

According to the survey results, 58% of lawyers now report that they use  cloud computing tools for work-related tasks, compared to 38% in 2016. Small firm lawyers from firms with 2-9 lawyers were the most likely to use cloud computing software at 61%. Next up were lawyers from firms of 10-49 attorneys at 60%, followed by 59% of solo lawyers, and 51% of large firm lawyers (100 or more attorneys).

Notably, 8% of the lawyers surveyed indicated that their firms had plans to replace traditional server-based software with a cloud-based alternative within the next 12 months. Lawyers from firms with 2-9 lawyers were the most likely to plan to make that move (12%), followed by lawyers from firms with 10-49 lawyers at 8%. Next up were 6% of lawyers from firms with 100 or more attorneys, and solo lawyers came in last at 5%.

According to the Report, lawyers use cloud computing software for many different reasons. The top reason they provided was easy browser access at 65%, followed by 24/7 access to their law firm’s data at 61%. 48% reported that the low cost of entry and predictable monthly expenses were important benefits. 45% of lawyers indicated that robust data backup and recovery was a top benefit. For 35% a strong selling point was that cloud-based software is quick to get up and running, followed by the fact that cloud computing software eliminates IT and software management requirements at 31%. And last but not least, 34% shared that they used cloud computing software because it offers better security than they can provide in-house.

The results of the survey also showed that the majority of lawyers (55%) now telecommute on a regular basis. Of the 55% of lawyers who reported that they telecommuted in the past year, lawyers from firms with 100 or more attorneys were the most likely to do so (60%), followed by 56% of solo attorneys, 53% of lawyers from firms with 2-9 attorneys, and 49% of lawyers from firms with 10-49 attorneys

One way that lawyers access their information stored in the cloud while on the go is through the use of smartphones, so it’s no surprise that smartphone use by lawyers continues to increase. A whopping 79% of lawyers reported that they used an iPhone for work-related tasks, while 18% use an Android smartphone. Up next is Blackberry at 7%, and only 1.5% of lawyers reported that they never use a smartphone for work-related purposes.

One place that lawyers often use their smartphones is in court, and when asked how they used smartphones while in court, 54% shared that they used them for checking email.  Next up was calendaring at 40%, real-time communications at 32%, and legal research  at 22%.

According to the survey results, 29% of lawyers also use tablets in the courtroom. Some of the activities that lawyers conducted on their tablets included email (25%), legal research (19%), calendaring (14%), real-time communications (13%), and accessing court dockets and documents (10%).

Lawyers also regularly use laptops when they’re in the courtroom, with 44% of survey respondents indicating that they regularly did so. The most popular tasks accomplished with laptops while in the courtroom were email (34%), legal research (33%), accessing court dockets and documents (26%), and editing document (24%).

So that’s how today’s mobile lawyer gets work done on the go. How does your usage compare? Are you taking full advantage of the many benefits offered by mobile and cloud computing tools in your practice? If you’re not already using cloud computing software at your firm, maybe it’s time to consider an upgrade. After all, there’s no better time than the present!

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com. 


Round Up: Cybersecurity, Dictation Tools, and Law Firm Disaster Planning

SpiralI often write articles and blog posts for other outlets and am going to post a round up here from time to time (but won't include my weekly Daily Record articles in the round up since I re-publish them to this blog in full). Here are my posts and articles since  August:


In 2019, lawyers are using mobile and cloud computing more than ever

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

*****

 

In 2019, lawyers are using mobile and cloud computing more than ever

A little over a decade ago, the mobile revolution was launched when the iPhone was released in 2007. Just one year earlier, Amazon rolled out Amazon EC2, their first cloud computing service, and now, in 2019, many of the most popular websites, including Netflix, Pinterest, and Reddit are run on cloud servers hosted by Amazon Web Services.

It’s no coincidence that mobile and cloud computing tools launched so close in time. After all, mobile and cloud computing go hand and hand, and together they make today’s computing possible. This is because mobile devices alone are limited by their memory, processing power, and battery life. But when mobile phones and tablets are used with cloud computing tools, the data processing and storage needed to make mobile apps useful and functional can happen outside of mobile devices on cloud computing servers.

This combined utility has contributed to the significant rise in the use of cloud and mobile computing by lawyers in recent years. According to the American Bar Association’s most recent Legal Technology Survey, small firm lawyers are making the move to cloud-based legal software more than ever before, with 55% of lawyers surveyed reporting that they’ve used cloud computing software for law-related tasks over the past year, up from 38% in 2016.

And many more are thinking of switching to cloud-based legal software in the year to come. Small law firms were the most likely to plan to do so. The survey results showed that firms with 2-9 lawyers led the way at 15%. Next up was law firms with 10-49 lawyers at 14%, followed by firms with 50-99 lawyers at 13%.

According to the survey, the reasons for using cloud computing software are many. Ease of access from any location was the most popular reason (68%), followed by 24/7 availability (59%), and the affordability and the low cost of entry (48%). Other reasons provided by the lawyers surveyed included robust data back-up and recovery (46%), the ability to get the software up and running quickly (40%), the elimination of IT and software management requirements (34%), and last but certainly not least, better security than the firms were able to provide in-office (31%).

The top reason cited for making the switch – ease of access from any location – isn’t surprising since lawyers are more reliant on mobile devices in 2019 than they’ve ever been. In fact, according to the survey, 95% of lawyers reported that they use their smartphones outside of the office for law-related purposes. And, nearly half of all lawyers – 49% – reported that they used their tablet for law-related purposes while away from the office.

The most popular type of phone used by lawyers was iPhones, with 72% preferring it. Androids were next at 27%, followed by Blackberrys (2%) and then Windows Mobile (1%). Notably, despite the prominence of iPhone use by lawyers, 43% of lawyers surveyed reported that their firms supported multiple platforms for smartphones, rather than just one type of smartphone.

50% of lawyers have downloaded a legal-specific app to their smartphone, with legal research apps being the most popular. Similarly, 50% of lawyers have downloaded a general business app to their smartphone. Dropbox was the most popular, with 77% of lawyers reporting that they’d downloaded it. LinkedIn was next at 63%, followed by Evernote (37%), LogMeIn (15%), and DocsToGo (14%).

Do any of these statistics about how small firm lawyers are using cloud-based legal software and mobile devices surprise you? How mobile are you compared to your colleagues? And, is your firm in the cloud yet? If not, maybe it’s time make the switch.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com. 


Round Up: Legal Innovation, Law Firm Billing, Legal Tech Gadgets, and More

SpiralI often write articles and blog posts for other outlets and am going to post a round up here from time to time (but won't include my weekly Daily Record articles in the round up since I re-publish them to this blog in full). Here are my posts and articles from August and September 2018:


ABA survey shows lawyers are more mobile than ever in 2018

Stacked3Here is this week's Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

*****

ABA survey shows lawyers are more mobile than ever in 2018

The iPhone was released in 2007, and it revolutionized the way that we communicate and access information. Smartphones, once a novelty, are now commonplace, in the legal profession. This is because, unlike other types of technology, lawyers jumped on the mobile bandwagon fairly quickly.

As evidenced by the results of the 2017 ABA Legal Technology Survey, lawyers are more mobile than ever before. The reasons are many: mobile computing offers convenience, flexibility, and 24/7 access to important information. Given all the benefits, it’s no wonder that lawyers have taken to mobile devices like a fish takes to water.

According to the survey results, lawyers use a number of different types of mobile devices for law-related tasks while away from their offices. Smartphones are the most commonly used, with 96% of lawyers reporting that they used smartphones while outside the office. Lawyers from firms of 10-49 and from firms of 100-499 used them the most often, with both sets of lawyers reporting usage levels at 98%. Next up were lawyers from firms of 500 or more (97%), followed by lawyers from firms of 50-99 (96%), 2-9 (95%), and solos (93%).

Laptops are also popular, with 81% of lawyers using them for law-related purposes while away from the office. Lawyers from firms of 500 or more reported the greatest use of laptops while out of the office (94%). Lawyers from firms of 100-499 were next at 89%, followed by lawyers form firms of 50-99 (85%), 2-9 (83%), 10-49 (82%), and solos. (74%).

Lawyers were the least likely to use tablets for mobile access while away from the office, with 50% reporting that they did so. Lawyers from firms of 500 or more used tablets the most often (61%). Next up were lawyers form firms of 2-9 (52%), followed by lawyers from firms of 10-49 (51%), solos (49%), lawyers form firms of 50-99 (46%), and lawyers form firms of 100-499 (36%).

According to the lawyers surveyed, they used mobile devices from a variety of different locations.The most common place that lawyers used their mobile devices was their home (96%), followed by hotels (93%), while in transit (89%), airports (85%), clients’ offices (75%), in the courthouse (70%), and other attorneys’ offices (71%).

When it comes to courtroom usage, according to the survey, 57% of lawyers who appear in court have used laptops in the courtroom, up from 46% in 2014. Tops uses for laptops include email (34%), accessing key evidence and documents (33%), legal research (29%), accessing court documents and dockets (27%), calendaring (24%), and delivering presentations (23%).

80% of lawyers who appear in court report using their smartphone in court. Some of the most popular uses include: email (72%), calendaring (58%), real-time communications (44%), legal research (24%), accessing court dockets and documents (15%), and accessing the firm’s network (14%).

When it comes to tablets, 38% of lawyers who appear in court reported using them in court. Tablets were used to accomplish a number of tasks, including email (29%), legal research (25%), calendaring (21%), accessing court documents and dockets (16.5%), and accessing key evidence and documents (15%).

So that’s how lawyers are using mobile devices to practice law in 2018. How does your mobile device usage compare? If you use your mobiles devices less often than your colleagues, perhaps you’re not fully taking advantage of the many benefits the mobile computing offers.
Then again, there are undoubtedly drawbacks to the mobile age, not the least of which is the psychological impact of the perception of 24/7 availability. While it’s not always an easy juggling act, the benefits of mobile access are many, both for lawyers and their clients. The key is to find the right balance between the convenience of easy access to information and maintaining the necessary boundaries between work and your home life. Once you’ve found a balance that works for you, you’ll reap the benefits of the flexibility of mobile computing.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase, intuitive, powerful law practice management software for solo and small law firms. She is also the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a West-Thomson treatise. She is the founder of lawtechTalk.com and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. She can be reached at niki.black@mycase.com.

 


iPhone health app data used in murder prosecution

Stacked3Here is this week's Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

*****

iPhone health app data used in murder prosecution

If, like me, you’re a fan of the Netflix series, Black Mirror, then you’re well aware of the many ways that our digital footprints can potentially be used against us. In this series, the writers envision futuristic timelines where technologies currently available are taken to their extreme, resulting in disturbing, dystopian story lines, some of which have since come to fruition in one way or another.

The message of this series is clear: technology can greatly benefit our lives, but also creates the potential for unbridled violations of our privacy by governmental and corporate entities. It’s a delicate balance of interests that can easily go awry in the absence of careful, thoughtful regulation. And unfortunately, technology is moving so quickly that legislators simply can’t keep up.

One area where we’re seeing this delicate balance play out is in the courtroom. Data from mobile and wearable devices is increasingly being used in both civil and criminal cases.

For example, in mid-2015 I wrote about an emerging trend where data from wearable and mobile devices was being used in the courtroom (online: http://nydailyrecord.com/2015/08/14/legal-loop-wearable-tech-data-as-evidence-in-the-courtroom/). In that column I discussed two cases where Fitbit data was used: one where it was offered as evidence to support a personal injury claim and the other where it was used to disprove a complainant’s rape allegations.

Then, in early 2017, I wrote about another case where Fitbit data and other digital evidence was used to support the prosecution of a criminal matter (online: http://nydailyrecord.com/2017/04/28/legal-loop-fitbit-data-other-digital-evidence-used-by-prosecution-in-murder-case/.) In that case, a wealth of digital data was used by the prosecution to refute the defendant’s version of the events leading to his wife’s death, including cell phone records, computer data, text messages, information from Facebook, and his wife’s Fitbit data.

More recently, data from the iPhone Health App was used in court in Germany as part of a murder prosecution. In this case, the defendant was accused of murdering a medical student. The investigators were able to access his phone and obtain data from its Health App. Data collected by that app includes the number of steps taken, nutrition and sleep patterns, and a range of body measurements including heart rate. The app also provides geolocation data regarding the movement of the phone.

The data collected from the app corresponded to the prosecution’s theory of the case and its timeline of events leading up to and following the murder. The geolocation data provided evidence of the defendant’s movements throughout the evening in question, while the heart rate data indicated two different periods of “strenuous activity” which the app suggested involved the climbing of stairs.

A police investigator who was of similar size to the defendant recreated the events as it was believed they occurred and then compared the investigator’s Health App data to the defendant’s. The prosecution alleged that the similarities in the data indicated that the defendant was likely dragging the victim’s body down the stairs when his app indicated he was engaged in strenuous activity involving the climbing of stairs, thus supporting their theory of the case.

Once again digital data gleaned from a mobile device was used in court in an attempt to convict an accused rapist and murderer. The use of digital data for this purpose is something most people would likely agree with. However, there is a very real potential for abuse of the data our devices are collecting about us, as the Black Mirror series points out. Where we, as a society, choose to draw that line remains to be seen.

In the meantime, astute lawyers will educate themselves about the types of data available to them and will likewise be cognizant of the ways that data can be used in the courtroom to forward their client’s interests. In 2018, anything less would arguably be malpractice.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase, intuitive web-based law practice management software for solo and small law firms. She is also the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a West-Thomson treatise. She is the founder of lawtechTalk.com and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. She can be reached at niki@mycase.com.


Must-have Apple Watch and iPhone apps for lawyers

Stacked3Here is this week's Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

*****

Must-have Apple Watch and iPhone apps for lawyers

The iPhone celebrated its 10-year anniversary this year. In 2017, a decade after its release, it’s still the most popular smartphone with lawyers according to the recently released American Bar Association’s 2017 Legal Technology Survey Report. Of the lawyers surveyed, 96% used smartphones for law-related purposes while away from their office. And, the iPhone was the most popular smartphone by far, with 75% of lawyers surveyed using an iPhone rather an Android.

The Apple Watch, on the other hand, just celebrated its 2-year anniversary. Although I’ve not yet encountered any data on the percentage of lawyers using smartwatches, over time I’ve noticed more and more Watches appearing “in the wild,” including on the wrists of lawyers. So I wasn’t surprised to learn last month that since its launch, more than 30 million Apple Watches have been shipped.

Of course, there are hundreds of thousands of iPhone and Apple Watch apps to choose from, and I’m sure you’ve already got more than a few favorites. But you could always use more, so here are my choices for apps that are must-haves for lawyers.

First, if your practice areas require you to interact with people who speak a different language, a translation app is a must. For your iPhone, consider Speak and Translate, a free app that automatically translates what you say into the spoken word one of of 54 different languages. It also supports text-to-text translations between 117 languages. For your Apple Watch, there’s iTranslate Converse. This app ($4.99/month) allows you to translate conversations in over 100 languages.To use it, you simply speak into your Watch, which then automatically translates your spoken word into the appropriate language.

Another Apple Watch app to consider is Just Press Record ($4.99). This is a very useful app for recording and transcribing conversations and meetings. It allows you to record for an unlimited amount of time and then transfer the recording to your iPhone for transcription.

Another iPhone app that will appeal to lawyers is the free Time & Date Calculator app. Because we spend so much time calculating dates - such as due dates for a motion determining how long ago an incident occurred - a time and date calculator app is a must-have. This app provides a lot of flexibility and built-in tools to help you calculate dates across time zones and even down to the second.

My favorite iPhone scanning app is Scanner Pro. It costs $3.99, and lets you scan a document using your iPhone and then upload it as a PDF. The app also formats the uploaded document with OCR (text recognition) so that you can easily search the text of the document.

And last but not least is the Overcast podcast app for both the iPhone and Apple Watch. Ever since the Serial podcast took the world by storm, lawyers have become huge fans of podcasts. If you’ve jumped on the podcast bandwagon, then you need an intuitive, easy-to-use podcast app like Overcast. It’s a free app that is ad-supported, but you can have an ad-free experience, for $9.99/year. With the iPhone app you can play podcasts right on your phone and the Watch app allows you to choose and control the podcasts playing on your iPhone from across the room.

So there you have it: a few of my favorite iPhone and Apple Watch apps for lawyers. There are plenty more, of course, so don’t let me selections limit you. And if you don’t already own an Apple Watch, what are you waiting for? Add it to your wish list for the holidays. I assure you, you won’t regret it!

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase, intuitive web-based law practice management software for solo and small law firms. She is also the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a West-Thomson treatise. She is the founder of lawtechTalk.com and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. She can be reached at niki@mycase.com.

 


9 iPhone Apps For Lawyers

Stacked3Here is this week's Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

*****

9 iPhone Apps for Lawyers

According to the results of the American Bar Association’s latest Legal Technology Survey Report, six out of 10 lawyers use an iPhone. Since the majority of lawyers use iPhones and it’s been a while since I wrote about iPhone apps for lawyers, I figured it was high time I shared some of my latest discoveries. So, without further ado, here are 9 iPhone apps developed for lawyers that you may find to be useful in your law practice.


Lawstack is a free app that provides access to, among others, the U.S. Constitution, the Federal Rules of Civil and Criminal Procedure, the Federal Rules of Evidence. Certain state codes, including New York, are also available for purchase.


With SignNow, a free app, documents can be signed anywhere by simply uploading a PDF or Word doc via email, Dropbox, or by using your iPhone’s camera. This is a really useful app for busy lawyers who often need to obtain signatures from clients and others while on the go.
Livescribe Smartpen is a digital pen that captures your handwriting and sends it directly to your phone. You can then save the searchable document as a PDF and export it to other programs. The various pens start at $129.95, so they’re not cheap, but may just be worth the cost, depending on your needs.


Mobile Transcript is a free app that enables paperless depositions by storing digital transcripts received from a court reporter in the cloud, which can be accessed from any compatible device. You can then annotate, mark up, and share the transcripts with others. There is also a paid version of the app available for $29 per month, which allows you to upload your own transcripts into the app in either Amicus or Summation format.


Dictate+Connect is an app that turns your iPhone into a dictaphone. Once you’ve recorded dictation, you can rewind and overwrite your dictation in the app and then send the sound file to your assistant as a verbal memo. You can also use the app to record meetings. There is a free trial version of the app available but in order to record more than 30-second sound clips you’ll need to purchase the full-fledged version of the app for $16.99.


The Courtroom Objections iPhone app is your go-to objections guide. This app assists you with making and responding to objections in court by providing a useful list of common objections and responses. It’s not free, but at $2.99, it may just be worth the small price you’ll have to pay.


Courtroom Evidence is a mobile reference guide for courtroom evidentiary foundations. It assists you in laying the proper foundation for entering common types of information into evidence. The app is available in the App Store for $1.99.


DocketLaw is a free app that calculates event dates and deadlines based on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Also available for an additional monthly fee are subscriptions to rules-based calendars for specific state and federal courts. For example, you can access all New York court data for $49.95 per month.


Using Timeline 3D you can create a list of events and then add any relevant media. Once you have done so, you can present your visual timeline using a full screen and with a 3D perspective. You also have the option to export your timeline into PowerPoint and Keynote format. This app costs $9.99.
Your iPhone can be a great tool for your law practice; you just have to know how to use it! So what are you waiting for? Download a few of these apps and start practicing law on the go.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase, intuitive web-based law practice management software for the modern law firm. She is also the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a West-Thomson treatise. She is the founder of lawtechTalk.com and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. She publishes four legal blogs and can be reached at niki@mycase.com.


Second Circuit upholds New York’s bonafide office requirement

Stacked3Here is this week's Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

*****

It’s been a long road for New Jersey attorney Ekaterina Schoenefeld, who has, for years now, sought to practice law in New York without maintaining a physical office in the state. Her attempt to overturn New York’s “bonafide office” rule was, after multiple appeals, proven to be unsuccessful by the Second Circuit Court of Appeal’s decision in Schoenefeld v. Schneiderman,
Docket No. 11‐4283‐cv.

In this decision, which was handed down on April 22nd, the Court rejected her arguments in favor of invalidating the bonafide office rule, concluding that: “§ 470 does not violate the Privileges and Immunities Clause because it was enacted not for a protectionist purpose to favor New York resident attorneys but, rather, to provide a means whereby nonresidents could establish a physical presence in the state akin to that of residents, thereby resolving a service concern while allowing nonresidents to practice law in the state’s courts.” 

According to the Court, the prohibition on allowing nonresident attorneys to practice in New York in the absence of an in-state office, even though resident attorneys can use their home address as their office, was not unduly prohibitive, in part because “New York’s in‐state office requirement for nonresident attorneys admitted to the state’s bar, N.Y. Judiciary Law § 470, was not enacted for a protectionist purpose disfavoring nonresident admitted attorneys but, rather, for the nonprotectionist purpose of affording such attorneys a means to establish a physical presence in the state akin to that of resident attorneys, thereby eliminating a court‐identified service‐of‐process concern.”

In other words, the rule was purportedly enacted—not to discourage nonresident attorneys from practicing in New York—but to grant nonresident lawyers the privilege of establishing costly office space in New York, just as their New York resident counterparts have, even when their New York counterpart’s office consists only of their residence.

However, as Judge Peter Hall—the lone dissenter—points out, the Court’s assertion that this rule was not intended to prevent nonresident attorneys from practicing in New York is disingenuous at best: “It is undisputed that, at the time Section 470 was enacted, it was part of a larger statutory scheme designed to prohibit nonresident attorneys from practicing in New York.  See Richardson v. Brooklyn City & N.R. Co., 22 How. Pr. 368, 370 (N.Y. Sup. Ct. Feb. 1, 1862) (noting that the court “ha[d] always required that an attorney should reside within the state”).” 

He also disputes the validity of one of the main assertions in the majority’s opinion: that the in-state office requirement is necessary to ensure that lawyers can be served with judicial process. “Regarding the issue of service, the Court of Appeals itself observed that, although “service on an out‐of‐state individual presented many more logistical difficulties in 1862, when
[Section 470] was originally enacted,” today there are “adequate measures in place relating to service upon nonresident attorneys,” including the methods of mail, overnight delivery, fax and (where permitted) email, as authorized by the 5 CPLR, and the requirement under 22 N.Y.C.R.R. § 520.13(a) that nonresident 6 attorneys designate an in‐state clerk of court as their agent for service of process in order to be admitted in New York.  Schoenefeld, 25 N.Y.3d at 28, N.Y.S.3d at 8 224–25.”

In other words, the majority’s holding is self serving, and, if nothing else, serves to stifle innovation in the delivery of cost-effective legal services to legal consumers. These consumers who are increasingly unable to afford the high prices charged by traditional law firms who charge such high rates, in part, to recoup the significant overhead costs of running a brick and mortar law firm.

It is indisputable that the legal landscape is changing—especially for transactional lawyers. For these attorneys in particular, virtual law firms offer a feasible alternative to traditional law firms and allow for the provision of affordable legal services. And, with virtual law firms, the lawyer’s physical location is often irrelevant since all communication occurs using technology.

Using convoluted rationales to uphold antiquated rules that prevent lawyers with New York law licenses from providing much-needed legal services to underserved populations does a disservice to New York’s legal consumers and discourages innovation in the delivery of legal services. This disappointing holding is a giant step backward at a time when lawyers facing an increasingly competitive legal landscape should be encouraged to use new tools and office structures in order to improve client service and provide more effective, responsive representation.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase, intuitive web-based law practice management software for the modern law firm. She is also the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a West-Thomson treatise. She is the founder of lawtechTalk.com and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. She publishes four legal blogs and can be reached at niki@mycase.com.