Legal Definitions

Define That Term #288

Dictionary_2 Last week's term was genericide, which is defined as:

Loss of trademark protection that occurs when a specific brand name becomes identified with the entire type of product or service. For example, Xerox was in danger of losing the trademark on its name when "to Xerox" something was equivalent to copying it.

Edward Wiest got it right!

Today's term is:

usufruct.

Never heard of it.  Have you?

And, as always, educated guesses are welcome--dictionaries are not.


Define That Term #285

Dictionary_2 Last week's term was dower and curtesy, which is defined as:

A surviving spouse's right to receive a set portion of the deceased spouse's estate -- usually one-third to one-half. Dower (not to be confused with a “dowry”) refers to the portion to which a surviving wife is entitled, while curtesy refers to what a man may claim. Until recently, these amounts differed in a number of states. However, because discrimination on the basis of sex is now illegal in most cases, most states have abolished dower and curtesy and generally provide the same benefits regardless of sex -- and this amount is often known simply as the statutory share. Under certain circumstances, a living spouse may not be able to sell or convey property that is subject to the other spouse’s dower and curtesy or statutory share rights.

Edward Wiest got it right!

Today's term is:

res nova.

As always, educated guesses are welcome.  Dictionaries are not.


Define That Term #284

Dictionary_2 Last week's term was Feres Doctrine, which is defined as:

A legal doctrine that prevents people who are injured as a result of military service from successfully suing the federal government under the Federal Tort Claims Act. The doctrine comes from the U.S. Supreme Court case Feres v. United States, in which servicemen who picked up highly radioactive weapons fragments from a crashed airplane were not permitted to recover damages from the government. Also known as the Feres-Stencel doctrine or the Feres rule.

No one guessed this time around.

This week's term is:

dower and curtesy.

As always, no dictionaries.


Define That Term #283

Dictionary_2 Last week's term was jus cogens, which is defined as:

Principles of international law so fundamental that no nation may ignore them or attempt to contract out of them through treaties. For example, genocide and participating in a slave trade are thought to be jus cogens.

Edward Wiest's guess was pretty much spot on.

Today's term is:

Feres Doctrine.

As always, educated guesses are welcome.  Dictionaries are not.


Define That Term #280

Dictionary_2_3 Last week's term was eggshell skull, which is defined as:

A hypothetical medical condition used to illustrate the idea that if you are at fault when you injure someone, you are responsible for all the consequences, whether you could have foreseen them or not. For example, if you cause an injury to a hemophiliac who begins to bleed severely, you are responsible for whatever happens to him, even though you had no way of knowing that the injury would be so severe.

Once again, Edward Wiest got it right!

Today's term is:

sprinkling trust.

As always, no dictionaries, please.


Define That Term #279

Dictionary_2 Last week's term was words of procreation, which is defined as:

Language used to leave property to a person and his or her descendants, which typically take the form "to A, and the heirs of his body," where A is the person receiving the property.

No one dared to hazard a guess this time around...

Today's term is:

eggshell skull.

As always, educated guesses are welcome; dictionaries are not.