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More of My Top Life Hacks and Gadgets

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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More of My Top Life Hacks and Gadgets

Have you noticed how it seems like there’s never enough time to get everything done no matter how hard you try? Rest assured, you’re not alone. In today’s hectic world, balance is a goal often sought but rarely achieved. In other words, the struggle is real.

The good news is that there are gadgets and other life hacks that can save time and reduce aggravation. The trick is sorting through all of your options and choosing a few that truly make a difference in your day-to-day life. Fortunately for you, I love learning about and trying new gadgets and technology tools and am more than happy to share the results of my search.

That’s exactly what I did in last week’s column: I shared a few of my favorite life hacks and gadgets. But guess what? There are plenty more where that came from and in today’s article I’ll be sharing a few more of my favorite time-saving and annoyance-reducing tips.

First, there’s Amazon Household. Do you shop on Amazon a lot? Do your household family members also use the same Amazon account? If so, I bet you’ve had more than one holiday gift ruined by Amazon’s shipping notifications and/or algorithms that suggest you view similar items to ones recently purchased. That’s where Amazon Household comes in. It allows you to create a “household” with two parents and additional children/teens. Every person has their own login with its own purchase history, thus ensuring that notifications, such as shipping status, are only sent to the person who ordered the item. Also useful is that Prime benefits can be shared with all family members. Finally, you can set up your kids’ accounts so that they can’t make purchases without permission from a parent. Sound interesting? You can learn more here.

Another useful Amazon tool is a gadget: AlexaAuto. Essentially AlexaAuto brings Amazon Alexa to your car, so even if your car’s system doesn’t have Alexa built-in, you can still take advantage of it. It’s super easy to insttall, and once you’ve done so you can ask it questions, tell it to play music, control your home’s smart home features, and more. This gadget’s value really depends on how “smart” and connected your car already is and what you’d like to use Alexa for. My car is 3 years old, I hate paying for Satellite radio, and I refuse to listen to commercials, so I find AlexAuto to be an ideal choice when it comes to easily playing music in my car. It connects automatically (most of the time), and then it’s a simple matter of asking Alexa to play whatever type of music I’m in the mood for. For me, it’s well worth the cost, which is $49.99.

Next up is Sugru. It’s a moldable glue/putty that is an absolute lifesaver. You mold it into whatever shape you’d like and then let it dry. Among other things, it can replace broken plastic parts, repair cracks and breaks, make do-it-yourself device stands, and protect cords. I’ve used it for a variety purposes, including fixing an exposed iPhone charging cord and replacing a leg that broke off of our toaster oven. It comes in a variety of different colors and an 8-pack costs just $15.99.

Last but not least, save time and money with one of my favorite shopping browser add-ons for Chrome: Honey. This tool automatically enters current coupons codes into the proper fields when you check out on merchant sites. Another added benefit is that when you check out on Amazon, Honey will let you know if there are other sellers who offer the same item at a lower price. And best of all, it’s free!

Those are just a few of the tech tools and hacks that I use all the time. Hopefully one or two of them will do the same for you!

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com. 


Save Time and Aggravation With My Top Life Hacks ands Gadgets

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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Save Time and Aggravation With My Top Life Hacks ands Gadgets

Usually I write about the intersection of law and technology in this column. One reason I’m so passionate about technology is because it saves lawyers time and money. After all, lawyers’ daily lives can be hectic and stressful, and anything that can be done to reduce some of that stress is well worth the effort.

That’s why I’m sharing some of my top life hacks and gadgets in today’s article. None of them are in any way related to legal technology, but all of them save me time and streamline my day-to-day life. Hopefully a few of them will do the same for you, too!

First up, my trusty robot vacuum cleaner: the Roomba. I don’t know how I ever managed without it. I currently own the Roomba 690, and it’s a lifesaver. We have 2 dogs, who seem to shed year round, and my Roomba manages to make life with them so much better. Every night we set our Roomba to run in our two most-trafficked areas - our family room and kitchen - and then wake up to clean floors. A Roomba can cost anywhere from $200 to $300, but trust me, it’s well worth the price you’ll pay!

Next up, my recently purchased Mirror. It’s a full-length, interactive gym from which you can play one of hundreds of pre-recorded or live workouts (and there are also live one-on-one training sessions available). It’s like having a boutique gym right in your house. No matter what your poison - yoga, boxing, barre, dance, Pilates, cardio, and more - the Mirror has you covered. You choose the class length (15, 30, or 45 minutes) and the difficulty level (1-4), and then start exercising, guided by the full-length image of the instructor and your own image on the mirror as you work out. You can exercise any time day or night, so it’s perfect for busy lawyers without much free time - especially those with kids. So if getting into shape is one of your goals for 2020, the Mirror might be just what you’re looking for. Sure it’s pricey ($1495 for the Mirror itself and $39/month for access to the classes), but it’s a great investment.

Another recent purchase of mine that I highly recommend for the home or office is the Google Wifi Mesh Router. One of the best parts about this router is that because of the mesh network, which is made up of individual Wifi points that “talk” to each other, it has extensive reach. Another added bonus: setup is a breeze. The router is controlled via your smartphone, so the first thing you have to do prior to setting it up is download the free Google Wifi app (available in iOS and Android). Next, you plug in your primary Wifi point. The number of Wifi points that you use is determined by the size of your home or office. For a smaller space (500-1500 square feet), you’ll need one Wifi point. For a medium-sized space (1500-3000 square feet) you’ll need two. And for a larger space (3000-4500 square feet) you’ll need three. Not only does Google Wifi provide reliable, consistent internet access - it also offers a number of other great features, including the ability to prioritize a specific device and built-in family control features. A single Wifi point starts at $99 and a set of 3 can be purchased for as low as $242 on Amazon.

Last but not least, my favorite laptop stand, the Moft “invisible” laptop stand. This laptop stand permanently attaches to the bottom of your laptop via an adhesive backing. When not in use it folds nearly flush to the bottom of your laptop, lays flat at 1/9”, and is barely discernible. It weighs only 3 ounces. Its dimensions are 170x224x3 mm and it’s designed for use with laptops with screen sizes between 11.6" and 15.6”. It can be folded into two different height settings, and costs only $24.99. So if you’re in the market for a lightweight and incredibly convenient laptop stand, I highly recommend it!

Those are just a few of my favorite life hacks and gadgets. I hope a few of them sound like a good fit for you. And stay tuned: in the near future I’ll share a few more life hacks. So keep an eye out!

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com. 


Round Up: Book Reviews, Legal Research Tools, AI and more

SpiralI often write articles and blog posts for other outlets and am going to post a round up here from time to time (but won't include my weekly Daily Record articles in the round up since I re-publish them to this blog in full). Here are my posts and articles since December:


ABA Report: 2020 Legal Research Trends

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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ABA Report: 2020 Legal Research Trends

It used to be that legal research was expensive. There weren’t a lot of choices so most law firms simply paid exorbitant prices for access to case law, statutes, and treatises. But then along came the Internet, and it changed everything.

These days, with the rise of increasingly affordable legal research platforms and mobile apps, lawyers now have a  vast array of options when it comes to affordable legal research tools. Oftentimes, they’re even free. 

With so many choices available, it’s not surprising that the results of the American Bar Association’s latest Legal Technology Survey Report show that lawyers conduct legal research in a multitude different ways. Here are just a few of the interesting statistics from the survey on how lawyers perform legal research.

For starters, it’s clear that lawyers spend a good amount of time on legal research. According to the results of the Report, 17% of their workdays are devoted to legal research.

The legal research tools they used ran the gamut, with free legal research tools being the most popular. 65% of lawyers surveyed reported that they frequently used free tools, and 25% shared that they occasionally used them.

According to the Report, the top websites/tools used by lawyers for free legal research (in some cases the platforms were accessed for free via bar association memberships) were: 1) Findlaw (20%), 2) Cornell’s Legal Information Institute (18%), 3) Fastcase  (18%), 4) government websites 15%, 5) Google Scholar (13%), and 6) Casemaker (8%).

Lawyers reported using free online tools for obtaining information about: 1) general news (81%), 2) other lawyers (76%), 3) legal news (74%), 4) researching public records (70%), 5) companies and corporations (70%), 6) their state’s administrative, regulatory, and executive information (51%), 7) state legislation and statutes (50%), 8) case dockets (48%), 9) judges (47%), 10) legal forms (46%), 11) federal administrative, regulatory, and executive information (45%), 12) experts (42%), and 13) other state legislation and statutes (42%).

Of course fee-based services were also used often, with 57% of lawyers reporting that they regularly using them, and 17% occasionally using them.

When it came to fee-based legal research, Westlaw and Westlaw  Edge were by far the most popular, with 49% of lawyers reporting that they preferred them. Coming in way ahead of the rest in second place was Lexis Advance at 28%. Other tools used included Lexis Practice Advisor (4%), RIA Checkpoint (3%), Bloomberg Law (3%), Fastcase (3%), Practical Law (PLC) (2%), Casemaker (2%), CCH (1%), Casetext (1%), and HeinOnline (.3%).

Online fee-based tools were use most often to research: 1) federal case law (54%), 2) state case law from the state in which they practiced (53%), 3) other state case law (51%), 4) legal treatises and secondary materials (49%), 5) federal legislation and statutes (42%), and 6) legal citators (36%).

Some lawyers (44%) reported that they continued to regularly use print legal research tools. The information most often obtained using print materials were: 1) legal treatises and secondary materials (16%), 2) practical guidance (16%), 3) law reviews and legal periodicals (14%), 4) legal forms (13%), and 5) state legislation and statutes (9%).

Finally, when it came to the cost of legal research tools, the majority of lawyers (60%) reported that their firms either don’t bill clients for legal research or that the cost of legal research is incorporated into their hourly rate.  Surprisingly, 25% of firms still bill clients for the cost of legal research, with larger firms being the most likely to do  so. 37% of firms with 100 or more attorneys reported doing so, followed by 25% of firms of 2-9 attorneys, 21% of firms of 10-49 attorneys, and 16% of solo lawyers.

So that’s how your colleagues are using legal research tools. Do any of the statistics surprise you? How does your firm’s use compare?

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com. 


Make Technology Competence a Priority in 2020

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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Make Technology Competence a Priority in 2020


Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you already know that technology is changing the way that legal services are delivered. No matter what your practice areas, the impact of technology on the legal profession is inescapable, whether it’s digital evidence and ediscovery to data privacy issues and secure electronic communication. Technology is here to stay and ignoring it is no longer an option. That’s why technology competence is a requirement in the majority of jurisdictions in the U.S.

The American Bar Association first recognized the importance of technology competence for lawyers in 2012 when it amended the comments to Model Rule 1.1. This amendment imposed an ethical duty on lawyers to stay abreast of changes in technology. Since that time, the majority of state bar associations have revised the comments to their ethical rules to require that lawyers stay on top of changes in technology.

38 states now require it, with South Carolina, Michigan, and Texas adding a comment requiring technology competence to their ethical rules in 2019. Similarly, two other states, California and New Hampshire, while not formally adopting the duty to maintain technology competence, have confirmed in recent ethics opinions that lawyers have this duty. Notably, even Canada has jumped on the bandwagon, and on October 9 , 2019 the Federation of Law Societies of Canada amended its Model Code to include a duty of technology competence.

Of even greater import is that two states now require lawyers to complete technology CLE courses. These technology CLE requirements represent an important departure from business as usual and represent a clear acknowledgement that the legal profession is not immune from the impact of 21st century technologies.

Florida was the first to adopt new language into its Bar Rules to require lawyers to stay abreast of legal technology advancements by completing 3 credits of legal technology CLE per biennial cycle.  North Carolina followed suit in April of 2018, when the North Carolina State Bar Council voted to mandate that lawyers take one technology CLE credit each year.

Florida and North Carolina may be the first to enact these new CLE requirements, but they certainly won’t be the last. Rest assured, no matter what your areas of practice, or the size of your firm, the effects of technology are unavoidable, and ignoring it is no longer an option. In other words, your only choice is to commit to learning as much as you can about technology advancements, thus ensuring that you meet your ethical obligations and provide the best possible representation to your clients.

A great place to start is to read books on legal technology, follow blogs focused on legal technology issues, and participate in your local bar association’s legal technology committee—or start one if it doesn’t yet exist

Finally, consider attending a few legal technology conferences in the upcoming year. One conference to consider is ABA TECHSHOW, which is one of the most popular conferences for small firm lawyers seeking to learn about the latest legal technology tools and how to use them in their practices. In 2020 it’s being held in Chicago from February 26 - 29th, and I’m excited to be speaking at it this time around. It’s a great conference and with lots of educational and networking opportunities, so I hope to see you there!

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com.