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Round up: Paperless law firms, cloud computing for lawyers, and choosing legal software

SpiralI often write articles and blog posts for other outlets and am going to post a round up here from time to time (but won't include my weekly Daily Record articles in the round up since I re-publish them to this blog in full). Here are my posts and articles since March:


ABA on the ethical obligations of prosecutors in misdemeanor cases

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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Today I came across a headline that I assumed at first glance was an Onion article or some other type of satire. It had to be. The ABA Journal headline stated something that I’ve always assumed was simply a given: “Prosecutors must maintain ethical conduct during misdemeanor plea deals, ABA ethics opinion says.”

Note that what the headline failed to mention was the the opinion addressed prosecutors obligations when interacting with unrepresented misdemeanor defendants. But even so - come on! How could there be any confusion on that issue? Prosecutors are lawyers and, just like the rest of us, they’re required to act ethically at all times. There’s no “misdemeanor or lower” exception to ethics requirements. At least, not that I’m aware of.

But, nevertheless, the fact that the ABA felt the need to weigh in on this is an indication that there was a need for further clarity on this issue. And, if the ABA deems this topic important enough to opine on, then I likewise believe that it’s important enough for me to write about. So if you’re as curious as I was about this opinion, then buckle up and let’s dive in.

In Formal Opinion 486, which was handed down on May 9th, 2019, the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Responsibility considered the ethical obligations of prosecutors when negotiating and plea bargaining with unrepresented individuals accused of misdemeanors.

At the outset, the Committee acknowledged that while most prosecutors perform their job functions ethically, that’s not always the case: “Notwithstanding the commitment of most prosecutors to high professional standards, there is evidence that in misdemeanor cases where the accused is or may be legally entitled to counsel, methods of negotiating plea bargains have been used in some jurisdictions that are inconsistent with the duties set forth in the Rules of Professional Conduct.”

The Committee then turned to the accused’s right to counsel, noting that it is unethical for prosecutors to interfere with this right in any way: “Under Model Rule 3.8(b) prosecutors must make reasonable efforts to assure that unrepresented accused persons are informed of the right to counsel and the process for securing counsel, and must avoid conduct that interferes with that process.”

Next, the Committee tackled the plea bargaining process, explaining that when a defendant is unrepresented, prosecutors must discuss the known consequences of a proposed plea deal with the accused. This is because an unrepresented defendant is in a uniquely vulnerable position. As such, “if the prosecutor knows the consequences of a plea – either generic consequences or consequences that are particular to the accused – the prosecutor must disclose them during the plea negotiation.”

The Committee further elaborated on the obligations of prosecutors in this situation and provided examples of impermissible conduct:

“Thus, where a prosecutor knows from the charge selected, the accused’s record, or any other information that certain collateral consequences or sentence enhancements apply to a plea on that charge, statements like the following would constitute prohibited misrepresentations:

‘Take this plea for time served and you are done, you can go home now.’

‘This is a suspended sentence, so as long as you comply with its terms, you avoid
jail time with this plea.’

‘You only serve three months on this plea, that’s the sentence.’”

The Committee then turned to a prosecutor’s ethical obligations when extending a plea offer to an unrepresented and clarified that prosecutors cannot do so unless there is sufficient evidence to support the plea offer: “Under Model Rules 1.1, 1.3, 3.8(a), and 8.4(a) and (d), prosecutors have a duty to ensure that charges underlying a plea offer in misdemeanor cases have sufficient evidentiary and legal foundation.”

Finally, the Committee noted that a prosecutor’s ethical obligations extend to post-plea interactions: “If a prosecutor learns during the plea colloquy with the court or other interactions that the unrepresented accused’s acceptance of a plea or waiver of the right to counsel is not in fact voluntary, knowing, and intelligent, or if the plea colloquy conducted by the court is inadequate to ascertain whether the plea or waiver of the right to counsel is in fact voluntary, knowing, and intelligent, the prosecutor is obliged to intervene.”

That this opinion was even issued, my friends, is an unfortunate reminder of the state of our profession in 2019. That being said, it serves as a welcome, and much-needed, reminder to prosecutors who may be walking a fine ethical line when it comes to many of these issues: always ensure that you walk on the right side of that line, or risk losing your license to practice law.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com. 


New York court on privacy expectations in social media accounts

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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Every year around this time I begin to conduct research for the annual update to the Thomson Reuters criminal law treatise, “Criminal Law in New York,” that I co-author with Brighton Town Court Judge Karen Morris. During the course of my research I often discover cases that arise from interesting overlaps of technology and criminal law.

This year has proven to be no different, and last week I stumbled upon an interesting case from New City Criminal Court, which focuses on issues relating to whether the access to social media accounts by law enforcement triggers constitutional privacy interests.

In People v. Sime, 62 Misc.3d 429 (2018), one issue addressed by the Court was whether the defendant had a constitutionally protected privacy interest in the IP data and photograph metadata that she had uploaded and shared online via a public Instagram account.

In this case, the defendant was charged with, in part, unlawful disclosure of an intimate image in violation of Administrative Code of the City of New York § 10-177 [b][1]. It was alleged that the defendant, who was dating the complainant’s ex-boyfriend, posted nude photos of the complainant to two different Instagram accounts. The photos were allegedly taken by the complainant’s ex-boyfriend. One of the Instagram accounts was alleged to belong to the ex-boyfriend and the other was alleged to have been created in the complainant’s name by the defendant. As part of that prosecution, the court issued a search warrant on Instagram seeking access to the data connected with the two Instagram accounts.

The defendant challenged the search warrant, asserting that it was not supported by probable cause. She conceded that she did not have a privacy interest in the posted photos since they were shared on an account that was open to the public and had no privacy settings enabled. Accordingly, her argument was based instead upon the assertion that “there is a general right to privacy for the IP addresses associated with the person who posted the pictures and the metadata contained in the photographs public (sic.) posted pursuant to the recently decided case Carpenter v. United States, 138 S.Ct. 2206 [2018].”

As I explained in my article last week, in Carpenter the Court held that a warrant was required in order for law enforcement to access historical cell phone geolocation data. In the case at hand, the Court disagreed that the Carpenter holding was applicable on the gourds that IP data and metadata relating to an Instagram photo is not analogous to cell phone geolocation data.

The Court explained that unlike historical cell phone geolocation data, IP data does not necessarily provide information regarding the defendant’s specific location:

“Obtaining IP data does not provide the police the ability to exhaustively know a defendant's exact position — at best it might incidentally reveal what device was used to post a photograph in the general vicinity of an internet router. In other words, at most it will let the police find a building near the used cell phone or computer device on discrete dates when pictures were uploaded for the public to view, and has no bearing on the defendant's day-to-day movement…Similarly, photograph metadata might let you know what camera was used to take a particular picture, and (if it was not already obvious from the picture itself) where that picture was taken.”

Because IP data and metadata provide only a brief snapshot of the user’s location at any given time, the Court compared IP data and metadata to telephone billing records, in which customers have a lower expectation of privacy: “IP data and metadata are roughly analogous to telephone billing records, and there is no legal reason to protect this data to the same extent as long-term GPS data and cell-site information.”

Accordingly, the Court denied the defendant’s motion challenging the search warrant, concluding that “(T)here is no constitutional privacy afforded to the IP data and photograph metadata that the defendant uploaded and shared with the world, nor would a subjectively held privacy expectation be reasonable or one that society is prepared to recognize.”

Digital privacy rights are an important and evolving issue. Now that online interaction and mobile device usage are commonplace, data regarding all aspects of our daily lives is regularly collected by a host of third parties. As law enforcement increasingly seeks access to that information, courts will necessarily continue to grapple with the constitutional nuances presented by varying factual scenarios - and rest assured, I’ll continue to cover their efforts in this regard.

 

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com. 


Massachusetts weighs in on law enforcement access to real-time geolocation data

Stacked3Here is a recent Daily Record column. My past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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Now that most Americans own smartphones, privacy issues abound. Our devices collect a vast array of information about us. Some of this data is stored on our devices and some is shared with our service providers. As a result, one issue that has cropped up repeatedly is when and how law enforcement may access cell phone data.

One particular type of data often sought by law enforcement is geolocation information. Our mobile devices provide both real-time and historical data regarding our location at any given time. Obviously this information has the potential to be incredibly valuable in the context of a criminal investigation, so it’s not surprising that law enforcement often seeks to obtain it.

The United States Supreme Court addressed the issue of whether law enforcement may obtain historical cell phone records last year. In Carpenter v. U.S., 138 Sup. Ct. 2206 (2018), the Court held that a warrant was required in order to access historical cell phone geolocation data.

The law is not yet settled regarding access to real-time cell phone data, however, so I read with interest a Massachusetts Supreme Court opinion that was handed down last week that addressed this very issue. In Commonwealth v. Almonor, No. SJC-12499, the Court considered whether “whether police action
causing an individual’s cell phone to reveal its real-time location constitutes a search in the constitutional sense.”

In this case, the defendant was identified as a murder suspect, and one of the witnesses to the crime provided police with the defendant’s name and cell phone number. After obtaining other evidence, the investigating officer contacted the defendant’s cell phone provider and requested several pieces of information, including the precise, real-time location of the defendant’s cell phone.

Eventually the provider “pinged” the defendant’s cell phone and provided law enforcement with the exact location of the defendant’s cell phone. Officers then drove to that location, obtained consent to enter the home, and arrested the defendant therein. The defendant moved to suppress the arrest on the grounds that the ping of the defendant's cell phone was a search under the Fourth Amendment and Article 14 of the Massachusetts Constitution.

In reaching its decision on the issue, the Court acknowledged that a delicate balance was required when considering the enhanced surveillance capabilities that technological advances provided law enforcement. The Court explained that it is important to carefully “guard against the…power of technology to shrink the realm of guaranteed privacy…(and) that privacy rights cannot be left at the mercy of advancing technology but rather must be preserved and protected as new technologies are adopted.”

The Court noted that when police direct a service provider to “ping” a cell phone to determine its real-time location, it raises “distinct privacy concerns,” especially since said data would not be collected in the absence of law enforcement’s request. Notably, the Court determined that there is a reasonable expectation of privacy in this situation since cell phones are such an indispensable part of our lives and provide an incredible amount of information about their owners. The Court explained that “society reasonably expects that the police will not be able to secretly manipulate our personal cell phones for any purpose, let alone for the purpose of transmitting our personal location data.”

As such, the Court concluded that it constitutes a search when law enforcement obtains real-time location data from a cell phone provider, since doing so intrudes on the cell phone owner’s reasonable expectation of privacy. The Court explained that to conclude otherwise would “shrink the realm of guaranteed privacy…under art.14 and leave legitimate privacy rights at the…mercy of advancing technology."

Although the Court held that the exigent circumstances exception applied to the facts of this case, the overall holding is a step in the right direction.

Technology is pervasive in our lives and offers so many benefits. But when used by law enforcement, can sometimes be abused in new and increasingly invasive ways. Decisions like this one provide much-needed analysis and insight into the application of constitutional protections in the face of rapidly evolving technological innovation.

Nicole Black is a Rochester, New York attorney, author, journalist, and the Legal Technology Evangelist at MyCase  law practice management software for small law firms. She is the author of the ABA book Cloud Computing for Lawyers, co-authors the ABA book Social Media for Lawyers: the Next Frontier, and co-authors Criminal Law in New York, a Thomson Reuters treatise. She writes legal technology columns for Above the Law and ABA Journal and speaks regularly at conferences regarding the intersection of law and technology. You can follow her on Twitter at @nikiblack or email her at niki.black@mycase.com.