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Lawyers Need to Get a Life

Drlogo11

This week's Daily Record column is entitled "Lawyers Need to Get a Life."

A pdf of the article can be found here and my past Daily Record articles can be accessed here.

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Lawyers Need to Get a Life

Last week I attended the “Get a Life” conference in Chicago. Its goal? Help attorneys discover how to “run [their] practice without running [themselves] into the ground.” It was a great conference —really interesting and knowledgeable speakers, relevant and timely topics, great people, delicious food and good times.

The Total Practice Management Association did a great job, and it was well worth the trip.

Most notably, TPMA managed to put on a conference unlike any other I’ve ever attended. The overriding theme of the unique exhibit hall was difficult to miss: Practice law, but enjoy your life. Thus, in one corner, there was a large bunch of roses to smell. In another, a patch of green grass to walk on, a Wii game console in
another, and free massages were offered the last corner of the room —not your average law conference.

As I listened to the speakers discuss topics ranging from legal marketing, practice management and work/life balance, however, I wondered why it is that lawyers need to be taught how to “get a life.”

Why is it that the practice of law tends to eradicate the semblance of a normal paced life? How does our profession manage to suck the joy from the lives of
attorneys, leaving behind stressed out, argumentative, humorless individuals, eyes glazed over from fatigue, their personal lives in ruin?

I mulled over those questions as I absorbed the useful information being presented and became increasingly depressed at the notion that legal conferences of this nature were even necessary.

Without question, however, they are.

The practice of law is uniquely stressful, alienating and inflexible. Many lawyers leave the profession for greener pastures, including, somewhat ironically, many of the speakers at this conference. And, truth be told, they seemed much happier than some of the lawyers who were sitting in the audience.

That doesn’t necessarily mean that leaving the law is the only way for lawyers to be happy. Those lawyers who unexpectedly lost their law jobs as a result of the recent economic downturn would be well advised to take a long, hard look at their lives and assess their level of career satisfaction, however.

Those who determine that the practice of law is more draining than it is fulfilling should look at their fate as an opportunity to pursue an alternative career. An unplanned job loss might very well be the incentive someone needs to “get a life” —a happier, more satisfying life outside of law.

If the practice of law continues to bring you joy, despite its inherent stresses, tweaking the ways in which you manage and promote your practice will reduce the stressors and increase career satisfaction.

The conference was designed to provide information and tools for accomplishing that very task. Attendees learned that targeted, effective marketing and online networking can bring clients in the door. Likewise, focused, intelligent hiring —and firing — strategies can reduce unpleasant management issues down the road.

Similarly, outsourcing and the creative use of new technologies can simultaneously simplify a practice and cut costs.

If you enjoy practicing law, take steps to ensure that you will continue to do so.  Make it a point to attend the “Get a Life” conference in 2010 and learn how to eliminate stressors and streamline your practice.

You deserve to have a life, and this conference will help you to get on the right track.


The New York Legal Blog Round Up

Blawgs It's time, once again, for the round up of my fellow New York law bloggers' interesting posts from the past week:

Coverage Counsel:

New York Criminal Defense Blog:

Simple Justice:

The Elliot Schlissel New York Law Blog:

Wait a Second!:


Define That Term #321

Dictionary_2 The most recent term was dynamite charge, which is defined as:

An judge’s admonition to a deadlocked jury to go back to the jury room and try harder to reach a verdict. The judge might remind the jurors to respectfully consider the opinions of others and will often assure them that if the case has to be tried again, another jury won’t necessarily do a better job than they’re doing. Because of its coercive nature, some states prohibit the use of a dynamite charge as a violation of their state constitution, but the practice passed Federal constitutional muster in the case of Allen v. Gainer. The instruction is also known as a dynamite instruction, shotgun instruction, Allen charge or third degree instruction.

NY Law Guy got it right and Vickie Pynchon's guess was pretty close as well.

Today's term is:

reading on.

As always, educated guesses are welcome-dictionaries are not.


The New York Legal News Round Up

Latest_news It's time for the round up of New York law-related news headlines from the past week:


Lawyers-Get a Life!

Gal2 Last week I attended the "Get a Life" conference in Chicago. The goal of the conference was to help attorneys discover how to "run your practice without running yourself into the ground."It was a great conference-really interesting and knowledgeable speakers, relevant and timely topics, great people, delicious food and good times.  The Total Practice Management Association did a great job and it was well worth the trip.

Most notably, TMA managed to put on a conference unlike any other I've ever attended.  The overriding theme of the unique exhibit hall was hard to miss: practice law, but enjoy your life.  Thus, in one corner, a large bunch of roses to smell, in another, a patch of green grass to walk on, a Wii game console in another corner, and free massages in the last corner of the room.  Not your average law conference.

One thing that occurred to me as I listened to the speakers, was how depressing it was that this conference is even necessary.  However, it most certainly is.

The practice of law is uniquely stressful, alienating and inflexible.  Many lawyers leave the profession for greener pastures, including, somewhat ironically, many of the speakers at this conference.  And, truth be told, they seemed much happier than many of the lawyers sitting in the audience.

In this economy, many lawyers have lost their "law" jobs. Perhaps they'd be well advised to look at their job loss as an opportunity to get a life--a happier, more satisfying life outside the law.

Alternatively, if you insist on practicing law, I insist that you attend this conference in 2010. Because you deserve to have a life, and this conference will get you on the right track.


The New York Legal Blog Round Up

Blawgs It's time for the weekly round up of interesting posts from my fellow New York law bloggers:

Coverage Counsel:

New York Injury Cases Blog:

New York Public Personnel Law:

Rochester Bankruptcy and Debt Relief:

The Sienko Law Office Blog:

Simple Justice:

Wait a Second!: